POL POT’S NAME WRITTEN IN THE CHINESE LANGUAGE

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The above is an extant book available in China entitled ‘波尔布特在柬埔寨共产党正确领导下 柬埔寨革命的伟大胜利’.

This can be translated into English as ‘Pol Pot: Under the Correct Leadership of the Communist Party of Kampuchea, the Great Revolutionary Victory in Kampuchea is Assured’. This edition was published in 1978, and sells to today in China for around ¥20.00. Although lessons are continuously learned from the past, there is not the usual bourgeois over-simplification of reducing everything into a Judeo-Christian ‘good Vs evil’ dichotomy. Certainly, neither Pol Pot or the Khmer Rouge are demonised in China as they are in the West (despite a frank and critical assessment of the reality of Khmer Rouge rule). This is a matter of all-round education at school, college and university, with no allowance given to anti-Socialist hysteria, or the usual error of associating Scientific Socialism with the fascist ideology of Nazi Germany, etc.

Chinese language sources give Pol Pot’s birth and death dates as being May 19th, 1925 – April 15th, 1998 (although dates vary depending upon sourse – this date accords with Colonial French Intelligence Records). Pol Pot’s birth name is recorded as ‘Saloth Sar’, with the pseudonym ‘Pol Pot’ being transliterated into the Chinese language as ‘波尔布特 – Bo Er Bu Te).

波 = Wave (bo1, po1)

尔 = Like (er3)

布 = Notification (bu4)

特 = Special (te4)

Within the Khmer language the name ‘Pol Pot’ is written as ‘ប៉ុល ពត’, with the Chinese language ideograms suggesting the meaning of a ‘Bull-like Individual Who Delivers a Special Message with the Force of a Wave (hitting the shore)’. I intend to carefully research this subject and move through its terrain very carefully, with the idea that this research will encourage others to think for themselves and not accept the rather lazy mainstream narratives at face-value. As usual I reject a priori the bourgeois interpretations as being bias and unreliable, whilst seeking to establish facts from primary Chinese language (and other) sources. There is no need to ‘defend’ this method as it is nothing other than good academic practice.

Chinese Language Source: http://book.kongfz.com/270174/1262927719/

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