Lenin and the Fox

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Buddhist-Marxism Alliance (UK)

The Buddhist-Marxism Alliance (UK), being an expression of the leftwing intellectualism that permeates Oxford, pursues a Marxist-Leninist and anti-Trotskyite political agenda. As a supporter of Communist China, Maoism is viewed as an application of Marxist-Engelsism and Marxist-Leninism to the unique cultural and historical conditions of China. As for the Buddhist input, Buddhist philosophy is viewed as secular and non-religious, and useful for the ordinary people of the world to discipline their minds and develop a progressive attitude and functionality in the world. There is a definite support for vegetarianism and veganism, and the supporting of the development of a Socialist society that nolonger eats meat or participates in the mass slaughter and abuse of animals (a direct influence from within traditional Chinese Buddhism). Although Friedrich Engels, as a member of the middle class, did participate in fox-hunting, Karl Marx had quite another attitude toward animals:

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Lenin used to hunt (particularly during his exile in Siberia), but never for sport and always for food. However, within her book the ‘Reminiscences of Lenin’ – Nadezhda Krupskaya (Lenin’s partner) states that during his later life in Moscow, Lenin was out hunting oneday, when a fox ran-out and looked at him – Lenin did not fire. From that moment on, Lenin never went hunting again with the same zeal. When asked why he never shot the fox – Lenin said he realised at that moment just how beautiful the fox was. The actual quote reads:

‘The beaters drove the fox straight towards him, bu he seized his gun when it was too late. the fox stopped and looked at him, then slipped away into the woods. “Why didn’t you shoot?” I asked him. “The fox was so beautiful,” he said.’

‘Reminiscences of Lenin’ – Nadezhda Krupskaya – Kindle Edition (Loc 514) Originally Published in 1933

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