Master Zhao Ming Wang Features our Red Flag!

Qianfeng Daoisn (UK)

This is a screen-shot of just one very kind post that Master Zhao Ming Wang has made on his WeChat account operating from Mainland China. It features a picture of myself and my father – Peter Wyles – holding up one of our Red Flags! Master Zhao Ming Wang is the inheritor of the traditional Qianfeng School of Daoism founded by by his famous great grand father Zhao Bichen (1860-1942) in 1920 during the early Nationalist period (although much of his training was during the Qing Dynasty prior to the 1911 Revolution). Zhao Bichen inherited the complete and authentic Wu Liu School (also widely known as the ‘Longmen’ [Dragon Gate] Branch of the ‘Complete Reality’ [Quanzhen] School). However, as times were changing in Nationalist China, Zhao Bichen also studied the Western science of anatomy and physiology, and integrated this knowledge into the traditional framework of his Daoist experience (which he had gained by training with 36 different Daoist masters throughout his younger life). Zhao Bichen also broke with the tradition of only teaching one or two disciples per generation, and opened the ‘Zhao Gate’ to anyone who requested the teachings (regardless of class, gender or background, etc). As with all religion within modern China today, each supports the Socialist State. The Daoist teachings, although taught through the reforms of Old Master Zhao Bichen, remain independent and unchanged. I would point out, however, that Mainland China is a Communist country and that Master Zhao Ming Wang is proud of the accomplishments of the Communist Part of China (CPC). The Qianfeng School teaches anyone irrespective of where they are from or regardless of any political views held. This system of interaction is dependent upon virtue and respect. Obviously, if these attributes are lacking, no positive exchange can take place. In the above very kind note, Master Zhao Ming Wang thanks me for my life-long practice and support of the Qianfeng School, and for my ongoing translation work.

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