What is Spiritual Bliss?

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Within Buddhism, the realisation of a ‘still’ mind is also accompanied by a sense of psychological completeness and physical tranquillity. What is this feeling of bliss? Over the years I have experienced this bliss many times during yoga relaxation and seated meditation practice. Although many spiritual practitioners ascribe to the notion that something ethereal is ‘entering’ their mind and body from the outside universe, I do not subscribe to this interpretation. This is because my experience during these ‘peak’ times, is that of a body-wide set of very subtle but precise muscular contractions, that are default set to achieve a sense of ‘bliss’ in the body. This feeling of physical bliss has a corresponding psychological reaction that ‘mirrors’ this experience as a profound sense of well-being in the mind. Given that this ‘bliss’ experience does not enter from ‘outside’ the body, what is its physical origination? It seems to be linked to the pleasurable muscular contractions experienced during sexual intercourse – minus the orgasm – which is further linked to the childbirth process. This area of physical evolutionary development appears to be where the experience of spiritual bliss originates. It is, therefore, a category error to suggest that this obviously ‘physical’ experience has a ‘non-physical’ origination. It is perhaps ironic, that a spiritual practitioner must spend long years in celibate practice before this (sexually related) experience is triggered. Just as a pregnant woman giving birth experiences a naturally changing brain-wave frequency (to facilitate the psychological and physical birthing process), it could well be that when a meditator reaches (artificially) exactly the same mind-frequency level (as a pregnant woman in labour), this muscular contraction response is triggered (even in men) and experienced outside of sexual intercourse and child-birth. When experienced through spiritual practice, this ‘bliss’ appears to facilitate a sense of ‘oneness’ (despite the isolatory nature of most spiritual practice). Whereas a pregnant woman may experience a sense of ‘oneness’ with her baby and partner – and a lover a sense of unity with their beloved – a spiritual practitioner experiences a sense of ‘oneness’ only with themselves, quite often justified as being part of an ‘imagined’ universe.

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