Moved by the Holy Spirit – the Christianisation of Chinese Martial Arts

Disclaimer: I reject any and all misrepresentations of Chinese history and culture originating in the West, and continuously work to expose this anti-Chinese racism.  Chinese culture is criticised a priori by a West that would like to see Communist China destroyed.  In the above video, however, a fair point about ‘fake’ Chinese martial arts from a bourgeois, scientific perspective is made.  I reject the bourgeois aspect of this criticism as being ‘invalid’, and embrace the scientific criticism as ‘valid’.  It is science and not capitalism that is important, and which must be encouraged amongst the masses.

Before Liberation, the era of Western imperialism in China (prior to 1949), did much damage to Chinese culture and Chinese self-esteem.  This destruction of another culture was premised upon racism and the duplicity of the Christian missionaries, as well as their alien (and inverted) notions of monotheism, souls, and heaven and hell, etc.  In the above collection of bizarre martial arts clip of ‘no touch’ qi power, I see the Christian ‘holy spirit’ in operation!  This is quite prevalent still in Chinese diasporic areas that still collaborate with Western capitalism and its religion (such as Taiwan and Singapore, for instance), but is slowly dying out on Mainland China. Modern Chinese people today are literate and have thrown-off the ‘inverted’ mind-set of Western bourgeois influence.  In over 40 years of training in a non-commercial family lineage of Chinese gongfu, and despite training with many elderly masters in Hong Kong and elsewhere, I can say without a shadow of a doubt, that there is no such thing as ’empty force’ in authentic Chinese martial arts.  There is no Chinese text, ancient or modern, that states that another person (or object) can be moved (or influenced) by another person simply by the power of ‘intention’, with no physical ‘touching’. I say this as an advanced Taijiquan practitioner and someone who has personally experience dropped bodyweight and full bodyweight emission through pushes, punches and kicks, etc., which I have written about elsewhere. The only way another person can be influenced at a distance (and persuaded not to fight), is through a positive no-nonsense psychological attitude and a calm and balanced martial posture that ‘projects’ an unruffled power. To uproot an opponent, the opponent must be ‘touched’, this is logical and scientific. What is observed above, is the recipients of qi power moving their own bodies on cue, and throwing themselves about as if the teacher has used an ‘unseen’ force upon them.  In other words, the recipients are wilfully collaborating with a social contract that ‘includes’ those who comply to the prevailing unscientific paradigm, and ‘ostracises’ those who do not.  This is the cult mentality. The first thing a martial arts student should do is respectfully question every aspect of the training.  Part of the problem is the intrusion of capitalism into traditional Chinese martial arts practice.  What we are seeing above is the ‘advertising’ of a product that must be ‘purchased’ by the client. In the old days I gained access into Chinese martial arts through family links and good behaviour.  I was ‘introduced’ from one teacher to the next and was never asked to pay a penny (although I was expected to train my guts out to succeed). I was told that the Confucian tradition meant that only people of good character could gain access to genuine martial arts knowledge.  Today, in the modern capitalist West, anyone can ‘pay’ to enter a training hall and this means ‘good’, ‘bad’ and ‘indifferent’ people ‘purchase’ the right to train.  Of course, in modern China, capitalist Westerners are charged to access basic Chinese martial arts training, but if they prove themselves worthy (which many do not), genuine training premised upon ‘character’ is secured.  Chinese people must eradicate ALL vestiges of Western imperialism and Christianity from their martial arts practises and return to the higher wisdom that defines Chinese martial history.

Leave a comment

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: