JFK’s Pro-USSR Speech (10.6.1963)

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‘Among the many traits the peoples of our two countries (the USA and the Soviet Union) have in common, none is stronger than the mutual abhorrence of war. Almost unique among the major world powers, we have never been at war with each other. And no nation in the history of battle ever suffered more than the Russians suffered in the course of the Second World War… At least twenty million lost their lives. Countless millions of homes and farms were burned or sacked. A third of the nation’s (European) territory, including nearly two-thirds of its industrial base, were turned into waste-land.’

President John F Kennedy – Speech delivered at the American University in Washington – two months prior to the USSR initiating the Moscow Test-Ban Treaty. (Quoted from the Introduction of ‘Russia at War 1941-1945’ – By Alexander Werth).

President Kennedy made a peculiar mix of rightwing and predatory capitalist-supporting speeches, together with the occasional leftwing speech supporting Unions and empathizing with the Soviet Union. Of course, he also made the usual anti-USSR speeches, formulated by the CIA and designed to sully and misrepresent the Socialist reality of the Soviet Union. President Kennedy was wrong on one vital point in his above speech, and it is significant of the level of ignorance within the US that it was not picked-up at the time. The US had previously been at war with Revolutionary Russia from 1918-1921 – where thousands of US troops participated in an ‘invasion’ of Russia – alongside the troops of 13 other nations. This ‘capitalist’ coalition was eventually defeated and expelled from Revolutionary Russia, and this part of shameful US history was quietly pushed into the background of America’s collective memory. Of course, President Kennedy was only adopting this conciliatory attitude toward the USSR, because he wanted a ‘ban’ on the arms race that the US had initiated since 1945. As Socialist Science was proving itself vastly superior to its Western capitalist counter-part, President Kennedy wanted to defuse the situation and move the US and USSR away from this type of conflicting competition. On the other hand, the Trotskyite Nikita Khrushchev was a fool who missed a vital opportunity of conserving the progressive nature of the USSR, whilst disengaging from direct conflict with the USA. Khrushchev blustered on about the USSR encouraging the International Proletariat to ‘rise-up’ in the US – whilst his domestic policies simultaneously ‘stripped’ the USSR of its self-respect and ability to ‘project’ Revolutionary power around the world.

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