Norman Tebbit’s ‘Cricket Test’ Comes Home to Roost

This inverted or distorted impression of the world serves as the basis for the psychology of the bourgeoisie, and has been expressed on a number of occasions by the former Conservative MP – and now House of Lords member – Norman Tebbit. He served under the notorious government of Margaret Thatcher throughout the 1980’s, holding a number of important ministerial posts, and actively participating in the devastation that regime inflicted upon the people and Socialistic institutions of the UK. In April, 1990, he made an extraordinary attack on the UK’s vibrant multicultural communities. He suggested (in a widely broadcast interview) that all the socials ills in Britain were not the product of capitalism, but rather the fault of the ethnic minorities who had come to settle in the country after WWII.

Bill Hicks: The View From Within.

‘In 1992 much of his output centred on the defeat of George Bush Jr, in the US Presidential elections following his successful invasion of Kuwait and southernIraqin the first Gulf War. Through such material Hicks described his political stance ‘as a little to the Left’. He says that he did not vote for Bush because the recent Republican administrations had sponsored genocide in South American countries – whilst the US media limited the issue to whether a new Democratic President would raise taxes. The natural Rightwing bias within theUnited Statessystem is so prevalent that any legitimate notions of Socialism are treated as if they are a crime of immense immorality, stupidity and the product of extreme mental illness. Hicks detested the mainstream media – and along with corporate advertisers – viewed it as a product of Satan’s seed. In this respect he could be very forceful in his opinions – surprisingly so when his style of delivery is taken into account. The passion manifests suddenly within a meandering narrative about this or that. Regardless of the raw human emotion, he never abandoned the principle of considered opinion gained through intellectual analysis. The intelligence of Hicks – and his intelligence was as able as any renowned thinker Western civilisation has produced – never abandoned an accompanying morality that moulded ideas and directed actions.’

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