Cornwall: Pendavy Stretching Stone

There is even talk of the Celtic King Arthur stopping by this stone to ‘worship’ on his way to a major battle in the area (Arthur’s final battle at Camlann in 537 CE – which happened on or around the site of the modern ‘Slaughterbridge’), with the modern Camelford believed to have been Arthur’s Royal Court of Camelot.

Tamar Otter & Wildlife Centre – North Cornwall – 1.8.15

The Tamar Otter & Wildlife Centre has Wallabies, Peacocks, Fallow Deer, Muntjac Deer, various species of owls, and many different types of ducks and birds roaming free. This assortment includes Giant British Rabbits, and of course, Asian and British Otters – the Asian Otters particularly make a tremendous noise and are very playful around mealtimes! Sometimes, the Fallow Deer, (which are led by a magnificent stag), wander over to visitors and are happy to be hand-fed with food available for purchase from the Centre. Obviously the nearer to opening time, the more willing the hungry Deer are to come close.

The Ruins of Penhallam Manor – Northeast Cornwall – 30.7.15

Although only the foundations exist dating to 13th century renovations, (the home was eventually abandoned in the early 15th century), they reveal expert stone-masonry, architectural design, and building craftsmanship, as well as over-all expertise in positioning of the stricture and the good use of natural terrain, (the local river, for instance, was diverted to form the water in the encircling moat). The area of Penhallam was awarded to the de Cardinham family from France, and Penhallam Manor apparently served as one of their stately homes – such was the family’s importance in the new Norman social order in Britain. English Heritage maintain the site – which is free to enter for the general public. The ruins lie in a forest clearing that is about a 15 minute walk from the small car park (which is designed for 5 cars). It is a beautiful place to visit.