Master Xu Yun and Tibet 1911-12

Xu Yun achieved this by requesting that the well known Tibetan Lama living in China – the Venerable Dong Bao – also known as the ‘The Dharma King of the Four Gems’, be sent to Tibet to mediate between the Tibetan authorities and the Nationalist Government. Xu Yun was sent to personally meet with Dong Bao and deliver a Government letter requesting his help. At first Dong Bao declined due to old age, but Xu Yun said that the Tibetan people still tremble at the memory of a previous punitive Chinese army led by Zhao Er Feng – and that bloodshed could be avoided through discussion.

China’s Revolutionary Path is Correct

The problem with this ‘rightest’ deviation from Communist comradeliness, is that it plays directly into the hands of the political rightwing and gives fuel to the racially motivated ideologues. Many in the West oppose China from a position of residual racism. This is the bourgeois position of the need to denigrate and demean at the point of contact, used as a means to control and subordinate anyone, or anything that is perceived or ‘declared’ as ‘different’, and deviating from the presumed ‘norm’.

Master Xu Yun (1840-1959) – Present Awareness.

‘Buddhism was tolerated however, despite some historical ups and downs, but leaving home to become a monk has always been a difficult affair. It still was in 1858 when master Xu Yun decided to leave home and pursue the Buddhist monastic path. As his father was a government official, Xu Yun was expected to follow in his footsteps, get married and produce a son to keep the family name of Xiao going. Even though he had expressed spiritual inclinations to his father, his father would not give permission for him to leave. Instead his father arranged for a Daoist teacher to come to the family home and teach Xu Yun internal and external qigong – or ‘energy work’.’

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